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How to Get More Done in Less Time

Have you ever spent all day working, but at the end, after at least eight hours of straight desk time, you have nothing to show for it? How is that even possible? And how can you fix it?

By doing something unexpected: working for less time. It sounds backwards, but working less can up your productivity. As more demands are placed on you and your life gets busier, you often compensate by working harder and for longer periods of time. Instead, you need a smarter system that allows you to get more work done per hour. And to do that, you need to remove the activity that clouds your mind and slows you down: multitasking.

The human brain is not built to multitask. Ask someone to walk fast in a straight line and solve a difficult math problem; their walking speed will slow down while they try to calculate the answer.

When you do two things at once, your brain is "context switching." When you stop doing task #1 to start task #2, you have to mentally bookmark what you were doing and where you were to then come back after you finish task #2 to start task #1 again. This confusing chain of events is called a context switch-and just like a computer, your brain slows down when you give it multiple commands at once.

Many people live in a "mixed mode"-they're not fully focused on work, but they're not completely switched off, either.

It slows them down, burns them out and drains them of all their energy.

Signs You're Stuck in Mixed Mode:

1. You work until you're distracted. You work on one task until you get side-tracked, then you start a new task until your attention is diverted again. You have trouble focusing.

2. You are always multitasking and never fully disconnecting. You're at a social dinner but you talk about work, or you're at home with your family but you check emails constantly. You never completely relax and recover, so you feel tired all the time.

3. You don't tend to work on tasks until they are 100 percent complete. By ignoring the mental cues that you need to take a break, you run down your mental energy faster. When your concentration evaporates, you don't have the energy to reboot, so you get stuck in mixed mode.

Our bodies have natural "work and rest" cycles built into them. A runner who runs without rest will damage their body, but a runner who over rests will become weak. The solution? To run and cause a little stress to the body, then have a period of rest where the body recuperates and makes itself stronger.

The secret to personal performance is to work in a similar way. If you work without breaks, you will burn out-mentally and physically. But if you unplug too often, your performance will weaken. So to maximize your output, you need to focus your working time in 90-minute chunks ("focus mode") and follow up with 30-minute breaks ("stop mode").

You should try to get your first "focus mode" completed as early in the day as you can-logging 90 minutes of focused, uninterrupted work first thing will give you something substantial to show with just one session.

Next up will be your first "stop mode"-that 30-minute period where you're completely disconnected from work. The idea is to switch gears, to switch modes. So get away from your desk. Don't even think about work. Unplug and unwind. When you come back to your work, you should feel recharged.

If you run the "focus mode" session four times a day, you'll get six solid hours of work done, which is much better for you than working eight straight hours. And it's definitely better than eight straight hours of being in the "mixed mode."

Your thoughts will feel clearer because you're focused. You'll feel more energetic because you're not wasting your energy in the mixed mode any more. And you'll get more work done in less time.

Getting out in front with your business

Remember when you were excited about running your own business because you got to do the type of work you always wanted to do?  

Have you turned into the night owl who stays up until all hours balancing the books and spreadsheets?  If you want to escape, read on...

 

It's a scenario we often see when a business owner first comes to see us for advice.  They tell us that they absorb some of the expenses of running their own business by handling the accounts themselves, but there is a big cost in taking this approach because the very person who should be out there "front and central" as the face of the business is stuck in the back room with the spreadsheets.  

According to a report based on research from the International Federation of Accountants, using accountants is linked to better performance and higher profits for business. Those business owners who are doing their own accounting are not only adding frustration (and sleepless nights) to their lives but compromising their bottom line profitability as well.

Too often people associate accountants only with tax returns. However, Clarke McEwan prides itself on its business advisory role.  With regular financial "check-ups" about business performance we can analyze your accounts and see trends that might identify opportunities that would otherwise be missed, or prevent risks before they lead to disasters.

 

We have also found our clients can benefit from accounting and tax advice that has proven to work for similar businesses. 

 

Then there is the benefit of another point of view:  once you come on board we know your objectives and we can quickly see when your business practices are getting off track or are no longer aligned with your goals.

 

We also communicate with your staff and managers about how to improve business performance by developing inherent and sustainable values.

Expert analysis of your business leads to better decision-making and helps you to apply your vision more effectively. Global trends in every field have shown that businesses of all sizes, and even in all places, have better performance when using an accountant.    Accountants are experts in financial management, not just taxes, and this expert knowledge can be used to help your business thrive. 

If you are looking for ways to apply your goals and values to your business's financial decisions, we are here to help. Our Business advisory service gives you the advantage of having an expert on-board, while allowing you to focus on your vision for your business.

Talk to Clarke McEwan about how we can increase your performance and help you get out from underneath your spreadsheets.

Given the state of the property market in Australia these days, a not-uncommon situation can arise where a residential property owner seeks to demolish and subdivide the block containing the family home and build residential units.T implications of subdividing and building on the family property.

If a taxpayer has the available land of course, this can be a solid strategy. However it can cause headaches from a tax perspective - and in some cases the ability to access the main residence exemption and even the CGT discount can be lost.

Divvying up the backyard
A question that arises every now and then concerns the effects on the CGT main residence exemption where the owner decides to subdivide the land containing their principal place of residence, in some cases demolishing the existing home, and build residential units.

The scenarios that are typically raised involve one of the following choices:

  • demolish the main residence, subdivide the land, build two home units, sell one and live in the other
  • subdivide the land, build a home unit on the newly created previously vacant portion, and sell the new unit (with the original residence staying intact)
  • subdivide the land and sell the non-main residence block (with original dwelling staying intact on the remaining block).
  • When dealing with these situations, the following pertinent tax questions may need consideration:

    1. Whether demolition of the original main residence would trigger a capital gain or loss (if any)?
    2. What are the CGT implications of subdividing the property?
    3. Is the sale of the home unit or vacant land a "mere realisation" or is there is a profit-making activity conducted?
    4. How would the original dwelling/unit, retained and lived in by the taxpayer, be treated for CGT purposes?

    Note that there may be some GST implications that are not dealt with in detail here. Suffice to say that any venture undertaken by home owners in building units for the purposes of sale would, from the ATO's viewpoint, most likely constitute an "enterprise" and in some cases, depending on the circumstances, may necessitate an ABN and registration for GST.

    For a consultation about building on the family property and the possible tax implications contact us or  Book an Appointment.

     

    Three significant factors are shaping the profession of the future, Cathy Engelbert, CEO of Deloitte, told a gathering of accountants recently: the impact of new technologies, new demographics, and new client demands.

    "We're living in a time of unprecedented change and innovation," the Big Four firm CEO told the 110th annual meeting of the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy. "The future will evolve in ways we can't even imagine."

    Driving that evolution will be three particular shifts: the way in which technology is reshaping how we work, the way in which demographics and innovation are reshaping the workforce of the future, and the ways in which the needs of investors and shareholders are changing.

    The technology trend

    "Accountants have been around for just about every technology change that's ever happened -- starting with clay tokens thousands of years ago," Engelbert said, but the coming changes are unlike any in recent memory, comprising what she described as "the fusion revolution -- the fusion of work and technology and biology."

    "The proliferation of advanced technology can fundamentally change how we do audits, conduct accounting and serve the capital markets," she continued. "Now we have predictive analytics, automated workflow technologies. Last year was 'The Year of Cognitive Tech' at Deloitte," with the firm exploring and innovating new ways to apply the technology to its work. "We're doing better risk analysis. That is driving more real-time and forward-looking insight."

    "Imagine the day when technology allows us to audit 100 percent of a company," she urged. "Imagine the day when robotics is used to automate manual tasks like invoice processing. That day is coming. It's not totally here yet, but it's not science fiction, either."

    And while some in the profession may be concerned about technology automating accountants out of work, she pointed out that the field has already undergone intense automation over the past 30 years -- and has only grown.

    "Only one job out of the 200 listed in the 1950 census has been automated away. But the nature of jobs will change -- and new jobs will be created," she explained, citing a study that says 65 percent of current grammar school students will have a job that doesn't exist yet."

    What's more, no matter how much work computers and software may be created to do, "Humans will still be necessary for empathy, curiosity, creativity, intelligence and more. These are the hardest things to automate and replicate," she said.

    Demographics and innovation

    "The how, where and what of work is changing, and we need to adapt quickly," Engelbert said, citing the rise of the "open talent" economy exemplified by Uber drivers and Airbnb owners.

    Millennials are much more willing to change jobs and to create their own pathways to success. "Younger, digitally connected workers are managing their careers much more intensively," she explained, and the profession needs to support them. "How are we empowering our younger accountants? How are setting them up for success?"

    Almost as important is the need to make accounting attractive. "We need to tell our story to younger and younger people -- and we're not doing that very well," she warned. "We need to get on the radar of college freshmen before they decide on their majors -- when they're juniors and seniors in high school."

    "We have a dynamic, exciting profession -- we just don't talk about it that way," she continued, advising, "Whatever you find energizing about the profession -- talk to young people about that."

    Changing clients needs

    Just as new technologies are reshaping how accountants work, the firehose of data that's now available is changing what clients, investors and other stakeholders are looking for from accountants.

    "The volume, velocity and veracity of information that's coming out now makes for difficulties," Engelbert said. "We need broader insights that go outside the bounds of the traditional financial reports."

    "We need to fuse talent and technology," she said. "We can evolve this profession to much, much greater heights."

    In the end, she concluded, accounting faces sweeping, unprecedented changes -- but they come with tremendous opportunities.

     

    Know the CEO before you make an investment

    Some good advice worth sharing from Barrie Dunstan of Switzers... 

     

    Investors may perhaps be excused for feeling annoyed. Even if they are holding a portfolio of Australian stocks, they've been suffering similar movements in price to a portfolio of leading overseas stocks. Recent market chatter is all about Ukraine and China and nervous traders are reacting to possible adverse developments.

    Focus on the companies

    But investors shouldn't fall into the trap of following the short-term fluctuation, which only profits traders in uncertain times. If investors are to maintain some equilibrium in their investments, they need to rely on the diversification provided by the stocks they have selected, regardless of the day-to-day mood or the temporary effects of major world events.

    In the end, the performance of share portfolios ultimately depends on the earnings and profits of the underlying companies, shaped by key economic factors, mainly interest rates. Fascinating though macro economic analysis is for the hordes of economists around the market, it serves mainly to provide talking points for those trying to sell shares. Investors shouldn't let this chatter obscure the fact that picking the right stocks, at the right price, is the way to improve their equity market returns.

    For instance, anyone still holding CBA or CSL shares bought in the initial IPOs in the 1990s has achieved strong gains from their original investment over more than 20 years. It might seem like cherry picking to cite these two examples, but investors in the 1990s had more opportunity to participate in IPOs and many had the good luck and the good sense to seize these opportunities.

    A blast from the past

    In the case of CBA, the bank was the largest of the Big Four – but it suffered from a perception that it was bureaucratic and less nimble than the others. What made the shares such a good buy was that the Hawke government could not afford to see the IPO falter and so the shares were offered at bargain prices (in the several issues).

    CSL spent about 80 years owned by the Commonwealth government without attracting much interest from investors before being floated. While many investors would not have been equipped to assess its potential, anyone who met its young, articulate managing director, Brian McNamee, would have been in no doubt that CSL was a company going places. As a finance journalist, I met hundreds of CEOs of budding companies but, of them all, two stood out – McNamee and the founder and first CEO of Computershare, Chris Morris.

    Both companies, co-incidentally, were floated in 1994 – a year that foundation investors still holding shares won't forget. CSL investors are holding shares, now selling at around $70 each, with an entry price of less than $1 after adjusting for issues (see our recent update on the health sector here). Computershare investors, after adjustments for share splits and issues, paid only 11.25c a share for their original shares, which are now selling at around $12.

    The jockey or the horse

    Clearly, both companies owe their success to their unique positioning in growth industries and, perhaps, to some good timing. But it's doubtful if either group would have achieved their current success without the drive and vision of their founding CEOs. Just occasionally, it pays to back a brilliant jockey!

    A good jockey also can make all the difference in a company's early growth period. Think of the early pioneers and visionaries like Ian McLennan at BHP, Maurice Mawby at CRA (now Rio Tinto) and Frank Lowy at Westfield. But as we have seen in recent times, CEOs also can be a mixed blessing, especially if they stay on too long, like, say Leighton's Wal King, or dominate a company like Rupert Murdoch and News Corporation.

    Perhaps the trick is to know when to back the jockey and when to concentrate on the horse. Warren Buffett says that you should invest in a company which any fool can run because, eventually, one will.

    Important: This content has been prepared without taking account of the objectives, financial situation or needs of any particular individual. It does not constitute formal advice. Consider the appropriateness of the information in regards to your circumstances.

     

    Self Preparers Deadline 31 October

    With the Self Preparers deadline of 31 October fast approaching many of us will spend the coming weekend sorting out our taxes.  And it is not just getting the figures right that we have to worry about.

    Every year the Tax Office warns the community to be aware of fraudsters as they target people lodging their income tax returns by the 31 October deadline.

    Statistics reveal that in past years, the number of scams reported to the ATO more than doubled in just one month from 2,465 in September to 6,593 in October, which means that now is the time to beware.

    The ATO's Chief Technology Officer stated that: "Scammers are out to get taxpayers hurrying to lodge their return by the deadline." People should be on the look-out for tax scams and report them to us directly."

    The  Tax Office is also seeing more targeted scams sent to taxpayers where the perpetrators make the email more convincing by using the latest ATO website imagery and the names and signatures of real ATO staff.

    "People should also be aware of a nasty phone scam where taxpayers are threatened with arrest if they do not pay a fake tax debt over the phone."

    If people believe they have received a telephone, email or SMS scam they should contact the ATO on 1800 060 062 (8.00am–6.00pm, Monday to Friday).

    "When the public reports a scam to the ATO we work with our local and international partner agencies to shut down the scam website and pursue the scammers directly," said Mr Heather.

    From time-to-time the ATO will send emails, SMS messages or official social media updates advising of new services. The ATO's messages will never request personal or financial information by SMS or email.

    To increase community awareness of scams the ATO launched a video campaign on www.ato.gov.au/identitycrime with helpful tips for taxpayer to protect their personal information.

    If you think you may have been the target of a scam get in touch with the Tax Office as soon as possible. And, if you would like to free your time up this year you can always contact us by next Tuesday for a lodgement extension past October 31.

    #clarkemcewan #selfpreparers #lodgement deadline #taxreturns

     

    Spring Cleaning the Finances for a healthier Christmas

    While spring is usually associated with a clean-up at home, the co-founder of a payment collection agency believes it is an important time for businesses to do the same and get their finances in shape ahead of the busy Christmas period.

    Smell that? It's the seasonal bouquet of spring time, bringing with it the perfume of blooming flowers, the earthy fragrance after rain, and the heady odour of freshly cut grass. It also brings with it the smell of opportunity.

    Spring heralds the fact that Christmas is around the corner, and it's the time of year when you need to have capital available to buy more stock, pay seasonal workers' wages, and build up cash reserves before companies shut down for the holidays and recovering debts becomes much harder.

    With one in two Australian businesses owed more than $20,000 on overdue invoices, putting effort into this area can make a material difference to your business' bottom line.

    Unclogging cash flow entails taking stock of all of the overdue invoices, organising them by due date, and then tackling them one by one – with the oldest invoices receiving your immediate attention.

    Remember: as an invoice ages, the cash becomes harder to recover, and the probability of making a collection decreases

    As part of this debt spring clean, you'll need to prepare a log of all previous communications undertaken with each client in relation to the debt. This includes the date they received the first bill, who it was addressed to, and any subsequent interactions.

    An audit trail of communications will help you counter the top two debtor excuses: "I never got your invoice" and "You should have reminded me to pay."

    Each debt needs to be dealt with on a case by case basis. Generally, using different forms of communication as the debt ages is the recommended course of action.

    Start with an email reminder two weeks after the invoice due date, with copies of the overdue invoices attached, and give your customer a reasonable time to respond. At this stage, you might agree on a payment plan if your customer is experiencing cash flow problems.

    If that doesn't bear any fruit, follow up with a text message one to two weeks later (SMSes have a very high read rate). Otherwise, email a second payment reminder. Even better if debtors can click on a 'Pay Now' button from your invoice or reminder, as it removes friction from the process and enables them to settle the bill instantly.

    Two reminders should be plenty in terms of flushing out payment, but if the money still hasn't landed in your bank account, it's time to work the phones.

    If you've been dealing with a generic accounts receivable email address rather than a specific person, you'll need to identify the best person to chase at the business.

    But what if you've done all of the above, and still haven't had any luck?

    The next step is sending a debt collection letter, also known as a letter of demand. This is considered a more formal follow-up, and is typically sent with your business' letterhead.

    Recently, the acceptable time frame for sending a debt collection letter has reduced from 90 days to 60 days from when the invoice is due.

    You may also want to consider outsourcing collection of the debt to a debt collection agency. This agency works as an agent of your business to collect overdue debts, and is typically paid a fee or percentage of the total amount collected.

    Whether to go down this route depends on a number of factors. If it's come to the point that your business is running out of cash, then calling in the professionals may well be a worthwhile investment, despite the fees involved. The beauty of a debt collection agency is that it has the resources to keep the ball rolling when your own in-house collections have stalled.

    Another good reason to hire a debt collection agency is that they're one step removed from your business. While personal relationships with suppliers and customers can sometimes make it difficult to have that hard conversation regarding money, external agencies don't have that issue.

    Finally, if your debtors have gone into hiding, and aren't returning phone calls or responding to letters and emails, debt collection agencies have a number of means at their disposal for tracking people down.

    Ultimately, prevention is better than the cure

    Once you've gone through your cash flow spring clean, it's worth ensuring that you have an effective debt collection strategy in place to stop overdue invoices spiraling out of control.

    A pre-planned strategy will include your process for following up overdue debts, your time frame to escalate to management, and the third-party agencies (like legal and debt collection agencies) that you will call on as needed.

    If this is applied consistently with every customer, it sends the message that your accounts receivable house is in order, and reduces the likelihood that debtors will drag their feet when it comes to future invoices.

    A guide to developing a successful personal budget

    A good budget should be the foundation for achieving our financial goals. But all too often we abandon our budgets at the very first obstacle, meaning they're simply not worth the paper – or spreadsheet – they're written on.

    So what makes it so hard to keep to a personal finance plan and how can you give yourself the best possible chance of succeeding?

    THE PSYCHOLOGY BEHIND FAILED BUDGETS

    According to psychologist Rachel Clements from the Centre for Corporate Health many people fail to stick to a budget from a deep-seeded belief that they simply don't deserve to achieve their financial goals rather than from a lack of planning or preparation. 

    "How often are we told that 'money doesn't grow on trees' or something similar, which suggests that finances should always be a struggle? That's the belief we can take with us into our savings plan," Clements says.

    "But if your underlying beliefs are not aligned to your goal, it's not going to be achievable or sustainable no matter what you do," she says.

    So Clements argues that the first step in any successful budgeting plan is to step back and look at our own attitudes to finances. In doing so, we need to accept that there is nothing wrong with managing your money successfully and that, by making the right decisions and showing a bit of discipline, we're worthy of reaching our financial goals too.

    But if your underlying beliefs are not aligned to your goal, it's not going to be achievable or sustainable no matter what you do.

    A MOVING OF THE MIND

    Even once we've addressed our own attitudes to personal wealth, Clements says that sticking to a budget requires a conscious behavioural shift. In that sense, it's no different to having a plan for achieving any other goal. 

    But she says that getting the behavioural change that's needed to make a budget work requires consciously re-programming our minds about who we are and what we're like.

    "We all have a comfort zone and when we leave it our body has a strong reaction and we want to be pulled back in," Clements explains. "Although this might sound strange, a lot of people are comfortable when they're not in control of their finances."

    But convincing your mind that you're a different person isn't easy, especially if you try it all in one hit. For that reason, Clements suggests getting it use to the changing behavioural shift by starting with – and achieving – small goals along the way to achieving larger ones so that our mind sees that we're doing well.

    "As humans, we like to get reinforcement that we're doing the right thing," Clements says. "It's like people who set out to lose 10 kilograms. It's so much easier when they weigh themselves at the end of each week to show they're heading in the right direction."

    MAKING GOALS SPECIFIC AND MEANINGFUL

    Speaking of which, Clements suggests that you will stick to a resolution of any kind more easily if you're working towards something tangible.

    That means a key part of making any budget work is to tie your milestones to meaningful and specific financial goals. For instance, having a goal of saving $500 a month for a $6,000 holiday to Fiji in 12 months is more concrete and therefore more achievable than simply aiming to save $500 a month for a year – even though the two require exactly the same budgeting.

    BE REALISTIC AND PRECISE

    Another, more practical, reason budgets often fail has nothing to do with psychology and more to do with maths. Put simply, sometimes the data that goes into building them isn't right.

    For instance, if you're budgeting for how much to spend on power, and you base your figures on last summer's bill when the heater never went on, you'll have a distorted view of how much you need to spend each quarter. To get an accurate record you really need to go back over at least 12 months' worth of bills.

    Alternatively, budgets sometimes fail because we're simply too hard on ourselves. In fact, one study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology1 found that our self-control can actually get worn out if we use it too much. We might be saving for a specific goal but we do need to have a little fun too. So make sure you factor in things such as holidays, eating out, movies and other entertainment too: or even better, tie these treats to your savings goals along the way.

    It's also worth remembering that things rarely, if ever, go according to plan. For this reason, it's important to factor in a buffer that can be used for car or home repairs or for that large bill you didn't see coming.

    CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES

    At its heart a budget is all about living within your means to achieve your financial goals. And if you find your means are grander than you're allowing for – or if you want to save for something that you can't afford no matter how you play with the numbers – you really have two possibilities: scale back or bring in more money.

    If you're not prepared or able to scale back, you'll need to look at ways to potentially create a second source of income away from your primary work: whether that's a new or second job, a business on the side or an income-producing investment.

    AND REMEMBER…

    Nobody is perfect. There will be times when we stray from our budget: whether that's because we get carried away on a night out with friends or buy something we probably shouldn't have.

    So don't be too hard on yourself when you fall off the horse. After all, a dollar here or there won't cost you, so long as you don't do it too often. Just get back to your savings plan and start again while things are still salvageable.

    YOUR BUDGETING CHECKLIST

    If you're setting up your own budget, here are the questions you need to ask yourself first:

    1. What am I saving for?
    2. What milestones will I hit along the way?
    3. Is my data accurate?
    4. Have I factored in what will happen on a rainy day?
    5. Am I being too hard on myself?
    6. Will I bring in enough money to stick to this budget?
    7. What will I do if I stray from my goals?

    And if you want to enlist some professional help, Clarke McEwan can assist you with a financial planner  to help tailor a budget to you that will help you reach your financial goals. 

    Difference Between Binding and Non-Binding Beneficiary Nominations

     

    To be certain of who your superannuation money goes to on your death you should consider completing a Binding or Non-Binding Death Benefit Nomination Form. Biding nominations instruct your trustee on what to do with the proceeds of your super on death whereas Non-Binding nominations are more like a wish list to your trustee of how you would like your super to be distributed. Both have advantages and disadvantages as outlined for you in the following article by superguy.com.au

     

    http://www.superguy.com.au/difference-between-binding-and-non-binding-beneficiary-nominations/

     

    For advice on superannuation and SMSF's as well as your estate planning talk to Clarke McEwan Accountants and Business Advisors today on the Sunshine Coast 07 5475-4300 and  in Brisbane 07 3842-3128.

     

    #smsf #superannuationfunds #superadvice #superaccountants #smsfaccountants #estateplanning #lifeinsuranceadvice #supertaxadvice #brisbanesmsf #sunshinecoastsmsf #brisbanesuperadvice #sunshinecoastsuperadvice

    Business Identity Theft

    Individuals have long been warned about personal identity theft and advised to keep information such as passwords, their tax file number and bank account details as closely guarded secrets.

    However, the ATO has recently warned that thieves can target unsuspecting small businesses and the information that is stolen can be used to commit various crimes.

    Once a business identity is stolen it may be used to commit tax fraud, create other fake business entities, lodge fraudulent GST claims, and take out loans.  The identity thieves might then have access to a business entity's information, and through this, gain the opportunity to further employee personal information, tax file numbers, bank details from payroll data, super fund details and personal addresses.

    The ATO says considerable time and effort is required to restore a business's identity, amend credit profiles and sort out financial arrangements, so the best protection is prevention.

    The following steps be used to protect your business  from identity theft (and of course you personally as well):

    1. secure your business files and employee information when these are not in use
    2. regularly change all passwords (and don't use passwords that may be easily guessed, such as the business name itself)
    3. ensure that the business's principal and staff log out of systems and lock computers when they are not in use
    4. make sure that your computers and other devices have up-to-date security and anti-virus software.  If in doubt, consult an IT expert.  Clarke McEwan recommends that the cost of a small  IT consulting fee may significantly save you the repercussions of identity theft.

    If you are concerned that your identity may have been compromised, the ATO would like to hear about it (Call the Client Identity Support Centre on 1800 467 033).

     


    Contact Clarke McEwan